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HEALTH & WELLNESS by jeff csatari


Can Food Cure All? Ten healing foods to consider adding to your daily diet.


Now, new research suggests that the natural chemical may boost the body’s ability to fight off illnesses. Oregon State University scientists


reporting last year in the journal Molecular Nutrition and Food Research studied more than 400 chemical compounds in foods and found that resveratrol in grapes and pterostilbene in blueberries significantly strength- ened the human immune system when combined with vitamin D.


LONG BEFORE WE started popping pills for every ache and illness, people relied on food cures. But while civilizations throughout history have promoted the healing power of food, it has been only in the past 20 years or so that nutri- tion researchers have shown exactly how the specific nutrients in fruits, vegetables, nuts, seeds and proteins can benefit our bodies, prevent disease and even help cure health problems. So, before you head to the


drugstore for relief, consider the 2,500-year-old advice of the ancient physician Hippocrates, who famously declared: “Let food be thy medicine.”


Apple Cider Vinegar Taking two tablespoons of apple cider vinegar or having a green salad with


48 SCOUTING ¿ SEPTEMBER•OCTOBER 2014


vinegar-and-oil dressing before eating a high-carbohydrate meal could improve insulin resistance and help reduce the risk of diabetes. In a 2004 study published in Diabetes Care, Carol Johnston, Ph.D., Arizona State University professor of nutrition, found that drinking vinegar reduced, in insulin-resistant people, the typical blood sugar spikes caused by eating fast-absorbing carbohydrates. Johnston’s research showed that


taking vinegar had the same effect as expensive diabetes medicines.


Blueberries and Red Grapes Resveratrol, a compound in red grapes and red wine, has long been shown to improve cardiovascular health and reduce inflammation.


Beet Greens The potassium in bananas counteracts the effect of a high-sodium diet on raising blood pressure. But if you want to do even better than a banana, buy some beets at the farmers market. “Beet greens are one of the plant world’s richest sources of potassium,” says nutritionist Michael Roussell, Ph.D., founder of Naked Nutrition and MikeRoussell.com. Beet greens are the leaves and stalks attached to raw beets. Oſten clipped off and thrown away, beet greens are delicious steamed, sautéed, braised and even added to soups. Other potassium-rich foods include Brussels sprouts, salmon, dried apricots and cantaloupe.


Dark Chocolate “I consider chocolate a weight-loss superfood,” says neuroscientist Will Clower, Ph.D., author of Eat Chocolate, Lose Weight. A growing body of scien- tific research shows that eating dark chocolate can curb cravings for sweet, salty and fatty foods, helping you stay


FIND MORE wellness advice at scoutingmagazine.org/health.


CAP PANNELL


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