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RICK CHAMBERS PLANO, TEXAS


JOB Corporate executive


SCOUTING ROLE Committee chair, Troop 999


SUPERPOWER: SUPER ORGANIZATION (Able to improve troop function) As vice president for customer intelligence and analytics at Zale Corporation, Rick Chambers works 50 to 60 hours a week and deals with a 45-minute commute each morning and evening. Yet he still finds time to play a key role with a 99-member Boy Scout troop. “We do make time for what’s important to us,” he says. “Busy people are busy because they’re able to organize activities and order their lives in such a way that they can address a myriad of things.” Organizing is second nature to Chambers, who has spent much of


his career in quality engineering and operations research. Today, he applies that expertise to improving everything his troop does, from mobilizing for outings to communicating with fami- lies. “There is no process that works good enough for me,” he says. “It can always be improved.”


ADVICE FOR BUSY SCOUTERS “It sometimes follows that the more active you are, the more active your kid will be. Stay connected to your unit in whatever way (large or small) you can. Take adult training. A nice byproduct is that you are more informed, your kid is more active and both of you have more fun.”


FINAL WORD “The qualities of courage, honor, justice and a readiness to help those in need still have a place, and Scouting is a youth organization that teaches these values to our young men and women. I like spending time helping shape the future leaders of our world.”


LIZ YARON PADEN CITY, W.VA.


JOB Restaurant owner


SCOUTING ROLES Cubmaster and Webelos den leader, Pack 153; Advisor, Crew 2014; Cub Scout day camp director


SUPERPOWER: TIME MANIPULATION (Able to cook up Scouting fun) Liz Yaron works 85 to 100 hours a week at Home Plate Bistro, the restaurant she opened in January 2012. Yet she still finds time to lead two Scouting units, run a Cub Scout day camp and pursue a bachelor’s degree from the Art Institute of Pittsburgh. Oh, yes, and raise six kids ages 3 through 16. “On my


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breaks, I might be doing three different things between school and Scouts and work,” she says. Liz’s units meet on Tuesday


evenings at two different churches, although the crew sometimes meets at the restaurant if she can’t get away. Tuesdays are pretty slow in the restaurant trade, but week- ends aren’t. “On weekends when we’re doing a Scouting event, I end up having to bring in extra staff,” she says.


ADVICE FOR BUSY SCOUTERS “You make excuses for what you don’t want to do, and you make time for what’s important.”


FINAL WORD “The time I put in at work makes me appreciate the time I get to spend with my kids and Scouts on our activities.”


S COUTING ¿ SEPTEMBER•OCTOBER 2014


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