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PAMULA STANLEY RAMSTEIN AIR BASE,


GERMANY


JOB Stay-at-home mother of two boys


SCOUTING ROLES Acting Cubmaster and advancement chair, Pack 232


SUPERPOWER: ENHANCED AGILITY (Able to be a mom and a Scouter) When her husband, Arron, began a six-month deployment in late 2012, Pamula Stanley hoped someone would step into his role as Cubmaster. That someone ended up being her. While Arron was gone, Pamula’s life focused on her boys, Arron III and Chris, and the other members of Pack 232. “I know that on Scout nights my day will


revolve around Scouts,” she says. “I do my household chores and duties first thing in the morning; then the rest of the day is devoted to Scouts.” Despite her busy schedule — and


the occasional forgotten doctor’s appointment — she loves her time in Scouting. “Scouting has definitely made me a better mom,” she says. “It has connected me to other moms who Scout and stay at home in the area.”


ADVICE FOR BUSY SCOUTERS “Excuses are easy to come up with, regardless of your situation. I encour- age every single adult in a troop, pack or crew to volunteer for something. Start small and see where your skill set fits.”


FINAL WORD “Scouting has shown me how much I want to be with my kids more and not worry about the business of the world. Kids will be kids for a short time.”


PATRICK LYNCH GLOUCESTER, MASS.


JOB Recreation management student at Salem State University


SCOUTING ROLES Assistant Cubmaster, Pack 119; committee member, Troop 119; roundtable staff


SUPERPOWER: TIME TRAVEL (Able to go from student to adult leader in a flash) Most college students actively avoid early morning classes. Not Patrick Lynch. He prefers early classes because they let him finish his day sooner and have more time for Scouting activities. Like most busy leaders, Patrick


misses the occasional meeting. “When I was asked to become an assistant Cubmaster, the committee understood that I might not be able to attend every event and meeting because sometimes


I would have homework or other things due the next day,” he says. Patrick’s Scouting background has


made courses like backpacking a breeze, and he sometimes gets course credit for activities. In spring 2013, for example, he got credit for attending a camporee. “I just had to write up a little summary of what I did,” he says.


ADVICE FOR BUSY SCOUTERS “Try to get active as much as you can. Even if you’re in charge of one activity, that’s better than just being a Scouting parent in the background.”


FINAL WORD “As a college student, I wanted to find ways to help at different levels to give back to my local troop and pack for the many years of Scouting I have experienced. If you are a college student looking for a way to contribute your skills, volunteer in some way near your college or university.”


SEPTEMBER•OCTOBER 2014 ¿ S COUTING 39


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