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DANIEL


GRONDIN EDGAR, WIS. JOB


Third-shiſt manager at a hotel, working 10 p.m. to 7 a.m. four days a week


SCOUTING ROLE Scoutmaster, Troop 337


SUPERPOWER: NIGHT VISION (Able to get things done late at night) As third-shiſt manager, Daniel Grondin monitors the hotel, handles paperwork, sets out breakfast and greets the occasional late-arriving guest. That leaves five to six hours a night when he can — with his boss’s permission — work on Scout projects. He spends a lot of time reviewing Scouts’ advancement


statuses and researching merit badge opportunities online. “Researching merit badges


sounds easy, but you’ll get 2,000 hits and maybe 50 of them will be worth anything,” he says. Troop 337 meets on Sunday


aſternoons, so Daniel manages to get half a night’s (make that half a day’s) sleep between work and the troop meeting. “Then I’ll go home and basi- cally get a nap before work,” he says.


ADVICE FOR BUSY SCOUTERS “I know people are busy, but in today’s world with all the technolo- gies that we have available to us, a parent can hop on an iPad while they’re watching TV and do some research for the Scoutmaster.”


FINAL WORD “My schedule is very positive in terms of being able to do Scouting. It’s almost like being a Scoutmaster and getting paid for it.”


JASON HICKS COOKEVILLE, TENN.


JOB Attorney


SCOUTING ROLES Assistant Scoutmaster, Troop 108; unit commissioner


SUPERPOWER: ENHANCED COMMUNICATION (Able to be reached, whenever) Jason Hicks stays busy as an attorney, so he can’t attend every meeting of Troop 108. A good relationship with the troop’s Scoutmaster — they grew up together and shared a tent at Philmont — helps keep the lines of communication open. “We have an understanding that my commitments will keep me away but that I am always available for advice or


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a discussion via phone,” Jason says. Being an attorney also has its perks,


including office space and a secretary. “For a number of years I have been a counselor for a couple of different merit badges, and my secretary can sched- ule time for those boys to come meet me at the office,” he says. “That is one way I have stayed involved.”


ADVICE FOR BUSY SCOUTERS “Find a role that fits. Don’t be afraid to say, ‘I can’t do that’ or ‘That’s just going to be too much.’ Know your limitations.”


FINAL WORD “Scouting has helped me stay involved with youth, which helps me in my juvenile cases and my domestic cases where there are kids because I can understand more of what they are going through.”


S COUTING ¿ SEPTEMBER•OCTOBER 2014


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