This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
New BSA President Robert M. Gates hit the ground running at the 2014 National Annual Meeting. The former U.S. defense secretary autographed copies of his book Duty, attended important meetings and gave a rousing keynote speech to close the event.


Scouts in the program. The recruit- ment process, he said, starts with our youngest potential members. “We all know the downward direc-


tion of our membership numbers,” he said. “We must first stop the decline and then begin to address how we grow again. I don’t have any easy answers to this challenge. I do believe it starts with emphasis on recruiting Cub Scouts.” Growing the number of boys in


your Cub Scout pack begins with fig- uring out why they sign up in the first place. Gates offered a likely reason.


“Teaching leadership and skills are


important reasons for joining Scouts for all of us, but I suspect that for most parents of boys of Cub Scout age, what they want most of all is a chance to spend time with their kids,” he said. “Unlike many other activities available to boys, Scouting offers parents the opportunity to be fully engaged side-by-side with their child — not just cheering from the sidelines.” Hear Gates explain his vision for


Scouting by watching (or reading) his full speech at bit.ly/robertgates.


2


Cub Scouting’s New Look for 2015 THE CUB SCOUT BOOTH at the


National Annual Meeting needed a sign near its entrance reading “Heavy Traffic Ahead.” There was no spot in the exhibit


hall more popular than this one, where volunteers and professionals got their first look at the exciting updates to Cub Scouting that will debut in May 2015. Though some volunteers had


feared belt loops and other instant- recognition items were being aban- doned, the opposite is true. They’re


SEPTEMBER•OCTOBER 2014 ¿ S COUTING 29


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68