This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
WHAT WOULD YOU DO? Drug Stories


Ideas from the field: Enlivening an important Second Class requirement.


Scouter P.H. is looking for resources to better teach Second Class requirement 9a, which deals with the dangers of substance use, abuse and addiction. Here’s what readers suggested.


The BSA and Boys’ Life maga- zine offer the “Drugs: A Deadly Game!” program kit, which may be used to satisfy the Second Class requirement, Webelos fitness requirements and more. Find details and order kits at boyslife.org/links/scoutstuff.


*** ***


USE THE SCHOOLS We are blessed in the Fishers, Ind., area in that our school system has a program called D.A.R.E. (Drug Abuse Resistance Education) put on by our local police


NEXT QUESTION


FIXING WHAT’S BROKEN I attended a pack meeting in another council, and there was no Pledge of Allegiance, no one standing for the national anthem and no parent recognition when rank achievements were handed out. How would you handle


this situation? D.K. RIVERSIDE, CALIF.


WE WANT YOUR SOLUTIONS! Send your answers by visiting scoutingmagazine.org/WWYD. We also solicit new questions and pay $50 for each one used in this column. Or send your submissions to Scouting magazine, P.O. Box 152079, Irving, TX 75015-2079.


24 S COUTING ¿ SEPTEMBER•OCTOBER 2014


department. All fiſth-grade students take the course, thus satisfying the requirement for Second Class. [Editor’s note: Visit dare.org for more information.]


M.O. McCORDSVILLE, IND.


BOUNTIFUL RESOURCES Coordinate with your local Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD) or Students Against Destructive Decisions (SADD) chapter or local police. You can even invite local teens who have been affected, and have a real and honest conversation about it. [Editor’s note: Visit madd.org and sadd.org for resources in your area.]


E.H. KALAMAZOO, MICH.


KICKING THE HABIT As an addictionologist, I have done this requirement for my present and past units. Many members of the American


Society of Addiction Medicine would be pleased to do this as prevention outreach. You can locate a doctor in your area by going to asam.org. Also, your community mental health organization will likely have clinicians who would be available for this purpose.


Troop Committee Chairman F.L. WINDSOR, VT.


LOCATE A LAB Our troop had a state police forensic scientist who does drug testing on evidence come talk to the boys, complete with photos of what happens to the body with drug use.


D.H. DANESE, W.VA.


LEAVE IT TO THE TEENS Our former senior patrol leader helped organize a group to come to the troop to teach this requirement. They brought “beer goggles” and some other teaching aids to allow Scouts to experi- ence the bad effects of drugs and alcohol without actually taking anything.


R.L. HOUSTON, TEXAS


A LODGE-ICAL SOLUTION Every Elks lodge in the U.S. has a drug awareness chair- person. The Elks partner with the Drug Enforcement Administration to distribute DEA literature and to provide positive role models for the youth in their communi- ties. Elks lodges have access to additional resources to support their drug aware- ness programs. [Editor’s note: Details on the Elks National Drug Awareness Program are at elks.org/dap; the Elks website also features a lodge locator.]


District Commissioner G.Y. DES MOINES, IOWA


A MATTER OF FAITH If your religious faith has a code of health, this can be a good time to talk about it and how these substances are not in harmony with God’s laws for His children. Any resources for faith-based groups can be used. Personal and family stories of the abuse of these substances and their effects on others are effective, too. ¿


D.K. RIVERSIDE, CALIF.


JASON SCHNEIDER


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68