This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
With a camp shovel or sturdy pot, dig a


long, vertical pit 2 to 3 feet deep. It doesn’t need to be especially wide (think coffin-size), but it should be long enough for your body to fit comfortably. When it’s deep enough that you can lie in it and be completely below grade, line it with pine needles, dry leaves, or small boughs. Then, place live boughs across the opening so it is almost completely covered. Because the “roof” will be flat and not


pitched, it needs to be covered with multiple layers or you’ll get wet. Leave a small opening for your upper body, and then wriggle in feet- first. Pull additional boughs over you, leaving an opening for your face and head; otherwise it really will be a coffin. This shelter won’t be real comfortable, but by the time it’s finished you’ll be too exhausted to care. Rest peacefully, unprepared Scouter. ¿


JOSH PIVEN is co-author of the Worst-Case Scenario Survival Handbook series. Visit his website at joshuapiven.com.


Over 500,000 campers have lived our “AWE” factor on Charleston Harbor.


How about you?


“WORLD’S BEST” CAMPSITE ABOARD THE USS YORKTOWN


THREE REMARKABLE VESSELS


Book reservations online at www.PatriotsPoint.org for two-night packages that include: MEDAL OF HONOR MUSEUM HISTORIC AIRCRAFT


E-mail: camping @PatriotsPoint.org • 40 Patriots Point Rd., Mt. Pleasant, SC 29464 BADGES & OTHER PROGRAMS CLIMBING WALL


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68