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stress can become overwhelming. By build- ing a healthier, more equitable balance in your life—your home, your work, your family, and your Scouting activities—you create a buffer against stress. If one part of your life heads south, the strength of the others will prop you up. WALK THE DOG. Spending time with


a dog provides more stress relief than being around a two-legged companion, according to researchers from the State University of New York at Buffalo. PLAN LIKE A QUARTERMASTER.Planning


is the most important thing you can do to avoid stress, say many psychologists. In fact, a survey of 3,000 psychologists determined that planning your day, your week, and your year was the most effective stress-management technique. Schedule a regular time daily or weekly to check in with yourself and plan ahead. Doing so will give you a much-needed sense of control, reduce stress, and conserve energy


needed for when the unexpected happens. LEARN TO HOW TO SAY “NO.” This is a


tough one for Scouting volunteers, who by virtue of their “helpful, friendly, obedient” nature and on-the-job training are accus- tomed to saying “yes” to more and more. But anyone with too much on his or her plate will experience more stress if they don’t develop the ability to say no to more without regret. That’s where good plan- ning and learning to delegate can help. LASTLY, KNOW THIS: STRESS IS NOT A


SIGN OF WEAKNESS. It is, instead, a physi- ological call to action. Dr. Robert Epstein, a psychologist and author, says that 25 percent of our happiness hinges on how well we’re able to manage stress. So manage it … with a smile. ¿


JEFF CSATARI’S books, including the new The Belly Off! Workouts, are available for 20 percent off at rodalestore.com using the code “Scout” at checkout.


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