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5 7 8 6 5REPAIR TOOL: CANNONDALE


BMT 10 FUNCTION $17; CANNONDALE.COM A basic bike tool is mandatory gear on any ride. This one costs just $17 but has the bare essentials, including 10 bits with hex, a screwdriver, and Torx heads.


6SHOES/PEDALS: SHIMANO


CLICK’R LINE $120 (shoes); $70 (pedals); SHIMANO.COM Clipping into your pedal adds power and better efficiency as you spin. The unique Shimano Click’R Line includes shoes and clip-in pedals made for first-timers. An easy, low-tension clip-in/out mechanism makes foot connection on the pedal less intimidating. The shoes, which have leather and mesh on the uppers, offer an easy-to-walk-in sole with a recessed cleat.


7REAR LIGHT: SERFAS


THUNDERBOLT $45, SERFAS.COM Be seen! This premium LED light offers an eye-popping red glow to cars coming up from behind. It recharges via USB, no replaceable batteries needed. Silicone attachment bands and a sleek form let you place the light on the frame or seatpost with ease.


8COMPUTER:


BLACKBURN ATOM SL $35, BLACKBURNDESIGN.COM Track your speed, miles, time, and other necessary stats on a ride with this basic computer. Boasting a wireless transmitter, the Atom SL requires no cords. Mount on your stem or handlebars and go.


9BIKE: SCHWINN PRELUDE $250, SCHWINNBIKES.COM


Priced as low as $250, the Prelude is a good “starter bike.” Drop handlebars and a 14-speed drivetrain give versatility for climbing, descending, and attacking the flats. Comes with toe-strap-equipped pedals for a more efficient stroke.


PLAN YOUR OWN bike-touring route using this guide, including advice from a Scout who cycled around the globe: scoutingmagazine.org/biketour.


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STEPHEN REGENOLD is the editor and founder of GearJunkie.com


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