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WHY WE GIVE


The BSA’s strong moral code


WHEN MIKE AND GILLIAN GOODRICH discuss their family history with Scouting, it seems silly to even ask how they became major supporters of the BSA and the Summit Bechtel Reserve. In addition to Mike’s lengthy record as an Eagle Scout and adult leader, Gillian’s grandfather Hugh Comer was a very active adult leader and a Silver Beaver and Buffalo honoree who helped establish the Comer Scout Reservation, known as Camp Comer, in the Greater Alabama Council. “It’s pretty much a Scouting family on both sides,” Mike says. In addition, the couple’s three sons


are all Eagle Scouts. That’s one thing Mike says he’s most proud of. He regards


Scouting as one of the key influences on his own life. “I hope and think it had a lot of influence on my kids as they grew up, as well,” he says. Like Mike, Gillian says she values the


way Scouting instilled leadership quali- ties in her sons. But she says Scouting’s worth isn’t confined to teaching boys how to lead. Part of the Scouting program is showing them a good time and making character development fun. “The camping part was great,” she says.


“The boys really loved all the camping. Outdoor skills really give you an extra boost and confidence. It was a great program for them as teenagers.”


Still more important was the charac-


ter building. “You don’t want just good leaders,” she notes. “You want leaders with good character. You want strong citizens. All of our boys are good, strong citizens. Scouting helps you to get to that.” Specifically, she cites Scouting as helping boys establish a strong moral core and become more thoughtful, considerate people. “I think Scouts did that [for our sons]. It brought them a lot of skills they bring to what they do now in their lives.”


LEARN MORE about the BSA National Foundation at bsafoundation.org.


W. GARTH DOWLING


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