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MORE NEWS FROM NAM


Focus on STEM World-famous oceanographer Bob Ballard wowed Scouting supporters at the Americanism Breakfast with his impressive tales: his discovery of the Titanic, his Avatar- esque remotely operated underwater vehicle named “Hercules,” and his focus on educat- ing the next generation of scientists. Ballard introduced the second-ever Eagle Scout Argonaut, 16-year-old C.B. Wren, and he’s hungry for more. He says, “Give me all the Eagle Scouts you’ve got!” Watch Ballard’s address at NESA.org. Also at the breakfast, NESA announced the newest recipient of the $50,000 NESA STEM Scholarship, MIT student Patrick Lowe.


The Key 3—National President Wayne Perry, Chief Scout Executive Wayne Brock, and National Commissioner Tico Perez—listen during a pre-vote information session as vot- ing members of the BSA vocalize their opinions regarding the proposed membership-policy resolution.


With the new membership policy going


into effect Jan. 1, Tillerson reiterates that the interim will serve as an additional listening period to address the concerns of Scouting families and volunteers, as well as provide ample time for the BSA to arm members with the knowledge and resources needed to move forward. From his personal experience, Tillerson


says, “You really do get swamped with what’s changing. … It’s really useful to step back, look at everything, and also recognize what’s not changing. Because more often than not, most things are not changing.” The Main Thing— serving youth—remains the same, he says, citing all of the troops heading out for their weekend campouts and those who will continue to meet come Monday evening. “None of that’s chang-


WHAT’S NEXT?


Stay up-to-date on the BSA’s implementation plan for the membership-policy change by visiting bsamembershipstandards.org. And subscribe to our blog at blog.scoutingmagazine.org. We’ll keep you updated with need-to-know info and send it directly to your inbox.


ing. … And none of that will change unless you do something that changes that.” And as for the future of Scouting, Tillerson


says he has “great confidence” because the BSA has “all of the ingredients that organiza- tions would love to have when they’re going through significant change. … We have a very clear mission statement—to serve our youth; we have a very clear, common set of codes of conduct: the Scout Oath and Law.” He also notes the BSA’s trained leadership, resources for future training, a “best-of-class” Youth Protection program, strong investments, and youth programs. What’s more, he says, “We have an unlimited customer base.” Most businesses, he says, have to define


these factors for their employees and customers as a way to implement change—teaching the mission, the code of conduct, and more. But not the BSA. He says, “We have an enormous amount of foundational capacity on which to be successful. “You got on a train to a destination we


didn’t know. … We arrived and we’re at the destination—and the destination is we’re going to make a change,” he continues. “I know where this train’s going. It’s going to millions of kids that want to be served. We need every one of you to be on that train.” ¿


GRETCHEN SPARLING is Scouting magazine’s Associate Editor.


Redesigning Venturing Change certainly was in the air at the 2013 National Annual Meeting, resulting in vast tweaks to the 15-year-old Venturing program. Because of a decline in member- ship and a drop in the number of youth earning Venturing awards, the changes will include a freshly designed advancement program, new training programs, and much more. Get an in-depth look at these altera- tions on Page 8.


Summit in 2014 Yes, you read that right: 2014. Of course everyone had a great time at the 2013 National Scout Jamboree, which opened the Summit Bechtel Reserve, but what happens now? Summit CEO Jack Furst says the reserve will offer world-class high-adventure summer programs in 2014, aiming to attract 25,000 youth. Learn more and register at summit.scouting.org.


Ready to Set Sail John H. Clark, director of high-adventure programs, announced the Sea Base’s new- to-the-repertoire tall-ship sailing and scuba program based in St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands, set to open in 2014. (See bsaseabase. org/adventures.aspx for more details.) And if that didn’t inspire you to practice your bowlines, the revamped Sea Scout uniforms—modeled by Chief Scout Executive Wayne Brock himself—certainly did the trick. Check out the uniform on Page 10.


SEPTEMBER•OCTOBER 2013 ¿ SCOUTING 33


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