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SURVIVE THIS! by josh pi v en Deer in the Headlights? What to do when you run into something unexpected on the highway.


2 CALL FOR HELP on your mobile phone. Give your location and direc- tion of travel, using approximate distance from the closest exit and/ or a mile marker if one is visible. A GPS device, of course, will give your position to within a few meters. Stay on the phone as you check on any injured passengers. Tell the 911 opera- tor whether the accident resulted in bumps and bruises or more traumatic injuries and tell her the number of people in the vehicle. This informa- tion will aid the response. 3 ALERT OTHER DRIVERS. Have another adult open a roadside emer- gency kit and set up emergency triangles, traffic cones, or road flares several hundred feet behind the accident scene. This is especially important at night. (Don’t have an emergency roadside kit? Pack these items: bit.ly/roadside.) Place the warning signals in a


EMERGENCY SITUATION: You and your fellow Scouts and Scouters are on your way to Northern Tier for a weekend of skill building. Suddenly, a deer darts into the road and collides with the car. The injured deer hobbles off into the woods, but the car crashes on the side of the road. What should you do?


SOLUTION: YOU CAN’T EXCHANGE insurance infor- mation with the deer. So immediately help your fellow Scouters and Scouts.


56 S COUTING ¿ SEPTEMBER•OCTOBER 2012 Car accidents—not lightning,


forest fires, floods, or bears—are one of the leading causes of serious inju- ries to Scouts in the United States. This makes sense, because motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of death among 5- to 34-year-olds in this country. There are several steps you can take to not only increase the odds of survival for the victims, but also (equally important) to prevent a second accident and further injury. 1 PUT YOUR HAZARD LIGHTS ON as you move the car off the road. It should be as far from the travel lanes as possi- ble. Moving the car will help to avoid a strike from an oncoming vehicle, while the lights will signal your position.


line that angles away from the scene, across the shoulder, and toward the travel lanes. Avoid walking in the travel lanes. If a working flashlight is available, move it slowly in an up-and- down motion while the signals are positioned. For a car still in the travel lanes and unable to move, set up the warning signals in the appropriate lane, angling toward the open lane, to help warn oncoming motorists. 4 THINK BEFORE MOVING VICTIMS. In general, treating injured passengers should be left to emergency person- nel and unbuckling the victims is not recommended. This is because


READ MORE ABOUT transporting Scouts safely at scoutingmagazine. org/safedriving.


TAVIS COBURN


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