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SEPTEMBER•OCTOBER 2012 ¿ S COUTING


53


STARTER KIT: PETZL


CORAX $125, PETZL.COM This all-in-one pack of gear gives you the essentials to get roped up and off the ground. It includes a harness, locking carabiner, belay device, loose chalk, and a chalk bag. Petzl makes some of the best stuff in the climbing world, so you should be happy with this turnkey pack of gear.


ALPINE SPORT GLASSES:


METOLIUS CRAG STATION


JULBO TENSING $50, JULBOUSA.COM Named in homage to Sherpa Tenzing Norgay (though spelled differently), who became one of the first two men (along with Sir Edmund Hillary) to reach the summit of Mount Everest in 1953, these Julbo shades have a decidedly high-mountain aesthetic. The close-fitting glasses include shatterproof protective lenses, full UV-blocking ratings, and a flexible wraparound frame to hug your head—all for a not-so-high price.


METOLIUSCLIMBING.COM


Long zippers and a duffel-style opening on this made- for-climbing pack give quick access to a rope and gear. At 2,500 cubic inches of capacity, the Crag Station has room for a day’s worth of equipment and then some. An all-around tough build (ballistics fabrics, stout aluminum buckles) offers durability for years of use. Tuck-away shoulder straps and a hip belt unfurl for transport when you need to shoulder the load and hike back to a trailhead at the end of the day.


WIN THIS GEAR* by entering daily at scoutingmagazine.org/contests. We’ll pick one random winner on Oct. 1. *Prize includes everything except the rope and backpack.


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