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IDEAS FROM SCOUTERS


FOR WORKING WITH SCOUTS THE MOST POWERFUL WORDS in the


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world are, “That sounds cool. Make it happen.” —Cassie Johnson


27 BE WILLING TO DO WHATEVER you are


asking the boys to do. They will be more willing to participate if you make a fool of yourself first. —Stephanie Gourley


smarter than you think. —Andrew O’Connor SCOUTS JUST WANT TO HAVE FUN and


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learn. They never have an agenda. —Skip Tamke


30 TRUST YOUR OLDER SCOUTS—but verify! —Tim Hagey


FOR WORKING WITH FAMILIES THERE ARE NEVER ENOUGH volun-


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teers. Recruit those parents from the day they sign up their kid! —Jane Hansen


32 SHARE AS MANY DETAILS about an


event as you can before a family has to commit. That way they have every oppor- tunity to make sure it is right for them. —Shelli Smith Luna


33 STICK TO YOUR SCHEDULE. Families


will come to understand it’s easier to work into a planned schedule than to pull things together at the last minute. —Laurie Good Kautz


34 SOME KIDS HAVE A VERY structured


home life; others are the opposite. Make your den rules apparent from the begin- ning and stick with them. —Michelle Cianflone Flynn


35 WHEN SOMEONE ASKS YOU “HOW


CAN I HELP?” you’d better have an answer; otherwise, they may never ask again. —Dave Ruiz


FOR GETTING UP TO SPEED, FAST GO TO ROUNDTABLE, learn online,


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and make friends. —Christine Needham Martin DON’T WAIT to get all of your basic


training done. —Kirsten Johnson AT YOUR FIRST ROUNDTABLE or


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training, look for the person with the most knots on his or her Scout shirt. Knots indicate experience and knowl- edge, and those individuals are a wealth


SEPTEMBER•OCTOBER 2012 ¿ SCOUT ING 45 LISTEN TO THE SCOUTS. They are


of resources and contacts—and they are free. —Lindsay Foster TALK TO OTHER SCOUTERS. At


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summer camp or other council or district events, go to other campsites and talk to the Scouters there. —Chuck Pint


40 ASK QUESTIONS. Most leaders are


willing to help, but they don’t want to make you uncomfortable or overwhelmed. —Aileen Sheehan Masone


FOR MEASURING SUCCESS SUCCESS AS A SCOUTER can be mea-


sured in grins and laughter. —Tom Osen DO YOU GO HOME AFTER A MEETING


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TIRED BUT SMILING because you saw a boy do something big for himself that most people, even his parents, probably would never notice? That’s when you know you’ve done it right. —Phil Peck


43 SUCCESS IS SEEING YOUR SCOUTS


FOLLOWING THE MORALS AND ETHICS learned in Scouting and putting them into practice with enthusiasm. —Ronald Pierantozzi


44 SUCCESS IS SEEING THE SMILES of the


boys as they learn new things and watch- ing them come back every week eagerly anticipating more. —Charles Nesloney


45 WAIT 15 TO 20 YEARS TO SEE WHAT


KIND OF MEN THEY BECOME. Then you’ll know if you were successful. —Calvin Gray


MISCELLANEOUS TIPS THERE ARE SO MANY SCOUTING


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URBAN LEGENDS OUT THERE. (“The left-handed handshake has been banned because it’s a secret sign.”) If someone says something that seems odd or strange, ask where it can be found in print. —Michelle Matowski


47 PLAN FOR MORE than you can do in an


activity or meeting. —Bradley White-Findeisen


48 NO ONE, ESPECIALLY THE SCOUTS,


CARES WHAT YOU KNOW. What is impor- tant is what you do. —Joe Julio


49 LEARN TO LISTEN, not lecture; to joke,


not judge; and to laugh whenever possible. —Dan Hartnett


50 IN VOLUNTEERING, YOU ARE TRULY RECEIVING A GIFT.


The more time and effort you set aside for your Scouts, the greater the gift you’ll receive in return. —Anthony Daniel Thorne ¿


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