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Shared Wisd THE NEW-LEADER GUIDE: 50 TIPS TO GET YOU STARTED


WELCOME TO SCOUTING! You’re joining a force of volunteers a million strong, some who started in Scouting before you were born (see tip No. 38). Yet you may be uniquely qualified to have a powerfully positive impact on the young people in your


unit (see tip No. 43). No pressure, huh? We at Scouting magazine have been where you are, and we understand just how intimidating the job can be. So we created this handy


guide to help you through the first months of your Scouting career. Half of the tips below stem from our own experience; the other half come from Scouters across the country who responded to survey questions on our Facebook page (see tip No. 20). We appreciate their input and look forward to the day that you, too, start sharing your wisdom with Scouting’s next crop of rookie leaders.


1


ADD TO BOOKMARKS. MyScouting (myscouting.org)


is the entry point on the BSA Web site for all sorts of Web- based activities, including training, Internet advance- ment, and registration for national events. Signing up is simple, and there’s a tutorial if you get stuck. As soon as pos- sible, add your member ID to your profile so you get credit for online training.


2


BECOME AN ALUM. Even if you’re new, you qualify for the BSA Alumni


program (bsaalumni.org). Why sign up? Four words: free bugle-call ringtones.


3


ALL IN THE TIMING. Get all your Scouting dates on your family cal-


endar and fix any conflicts. Nothing’s worse than having to cancel a den meeting on your wedding anniversary (except not canceling a den meeting on your wedding anniversary).


4 42 SCOUTING ¿ SEPTEMBER•OCTOBER 2012


TRAINING BASICS. Every Scout deserves a trained leader, and


every leader deserves to be trained. The basic-training sequence has four phases: Fast Start, Youth Protection


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