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SCOUTING: What’s the main argument from Scout leaders against technology? W.B.: Some leaders don’t think there’s any place for technology within Scouting. They say Scouting is a place where youth should go to experience nature and should not have their devices around. Others think technol- ogy is necessary to be relevant. That’s the cultural war we’re in today.


SCOUTING:What are some examples of ways the BSA plans to use technology? W.B.: If you come to the jamboree in 2013, technology will be very inte- grated into the program. There will be an app for your phone that will show


‘He exemplifies everything the organization is and wants to be.’


ROB E R T J . MAZZUC A , OUTGOI NG CH I E F S COUT E X E CUTIVE


you all about the jamboree and where you are, what your schedule is, where to find the different activities. To take full advantage of all this, Scouts will have to bring their mobile devices with them.


SCOUTING: What else will be cool about the Summit? W.B.: All of our high-adventure bases are pretty unique. The Summit is going to be unique also. It will have things that you can’t get at the other three, such as whitewater rafting and moun- tain biking.


SCOUTING: And zip-lines. Didn’t you go down one there? W.B.: It was great! It was a lot of fun. The one I was on, you get up to about 40 miles an hour. [Laughs] My biggest fear was stopping.


SCOUTING: It’s clear the Summit is designed to help with recruiting at the national level. But what makes volun- teers so uniquely qualified to recruit at the community level? W.B.:The main thing is they are pas- sionate about the program. We need leaders to step forward because people respect them, respect what they have to say about Scouting. One-on-one com- munication recruits more youth than any advertisement or e-mail. Your next- door neighbor or someone at your church has a lot more impact.


SCOUTING:And that applies to recruit- ing Hispanics or other underserved ethnic groups? W.B.: I’ve often wondered what it would be like to move to another country, have a child of a young age, not speak the language, not understand the culture, and have someone invite my son to join a program that I know nothing about. Would I let him? It would be difficult. For me, what it


34 S COUTING ¿ SEPTEMBER•OCTOBER 2012


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