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ADVISORY


Prepared. For Disaster.


During emergencies, the Scout Motto shines. And there’s no better time to remind you to “Be Prepared” than September, which is National Preparedness Month. “If you want to help others in times of disaster, you’ve


got to have your ducks in a row,” says Richard Bourlon, health and safety team leader. “If you’re not prepared, if you’re not stable at home with your family, you won’t be in a position to help others in your community.” Bourlon adds that being prepared also means main-


taining your physical fitness to meet the demands of a dangerous situation. Mark Dama, team leader of insurance and risk management, points to the wealth of preparedness


materials available on ready.gov, which stresses being informed, making a plan, and building a kit for emergencies. Dama says that preparedness also extends to campsites and Scout meeting places. “We’ve had several situations where councils have lost power or lost contact with their service centers,” Dama says. “But because they had a plan, they were able to set up and help others anyway.”


NEED TO KNOW Can’t Wait for Japan?


Is it too early to get excited about the 2015 World Jamboree, when some 35,000 Scouts will convene in Kirara-hama, Japan? Nope!


WEB EXCLUSIVES Even if you’re new to photography, you’ll love


For info, go to scouting.org/worldjam


boree. Also, view Japan’s World Scout Jamboree Web site at: 23wsj.jp. You can register for the jamboree (starting Sept. 1) at myscouting.org.


18 S COUTING ¿ SEPTEMBER•OCTOBER 2012


September’s guide on taking better photos of your Scouts—find it at scoutingmagazine.org/photos. Plus, this fall, you can win gear at scoutingmagazine.org/ contests, including the rock-climbing equipment fea- tured on Page 52. In addition to gear, we’ll be delivering extras from the 2012 National Annual Meeting, such as a full list of Silver Buffalo Award recipients at scoutingmagazine. org/nam12.


DAN BRYANT


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