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board members from busi- ness and industry.


fSanta Clara County Council’s continuous feedback process that will be embedded in the JTE program in February 2012 with the launch of The Voice of the Scout.


National Commissioner Tico Perez ex- plains Journey to Excellence as “sustainable qual- ity that impacts the individual unit program and ultimately leads to increased youth-member retention.”


fbuild sustainable councils and units.


festablish highly engaged relationships with char- tered organizations and parents.


fmaintain an adequate pro- fessional staff capable of serving all available youth in the council.


fassemble the best possible executive board. Regional representatives,


many from some of the 11 councils that participated in 2010’s JTE pilot programs around the country, outlined ways they scored improve- ment in at least one of the program’s 17-point criteria. Among them: fAtlanta Area Council’s process for recruiting


fSam Houston Area Council’s ongoing Project 200 initiative to create that number of new traditional Scout and Venture units in the city’s underserved communities. A stirring presentation by


Jim Rogers, chairman of the Mission Impact Department, urged all Scouters to “con- front the brutal facts” and “leave the BSA a better place than you found it.” JTE, he said, will teach you what will really make a difference. “As we think about the future— prepared for life—Journey to Excellence will take us from good to great and set a new standard for youth develop- ment in America.” Finally, as Tillerson con-


sistently reminded everyone during the sessions, large and small: Stay focused on The Main Thing. And that is “to


serve more youth.” An exciting bottom line to shoot for on the BSA’s permanent Journey to Excellence.


If all of that sounds like


heavy-duty stuff, it was. But the 2011 National Annual Meeting also featured moments of Scouting’s trademark fun that matters, including NFL Hall of Fame quarterback Steve Young speaking at Wednesday morning’s Duty to God Breakfast about how faith helped him overcome his athletic limitations and author Richard Louv (Last Child in the Woods, The Nature Principle) expressing at Thursday’s Americanism Breakfast the ever-increasing importance of giving young people a “transcendent expe- rience in the outdoors.” Closing ceremonies at the


National Council Recognition Dinner paid tribute to Boys’ Life magazine’s 100th anniversary (2011) with a special appear- ance by Pedro the Mailburro and some laughs (and groans) from the venerated history of Think & Grin. Eleven new Silver Buffalo Award recipients were named, too. Naturally, scenic San


Faith and football dominated ex- NFL star Steve Young’s speech at the Duty to God breakfast. Young (left) shares an onstage huddle with Western Region board member and event chairman Paul Moffat.


40 S COUTING ¿ SEPTEMBER•OCTOBER 2011


Diego provided the perfect backdrop for plenty of extracurricular activities in the city’s National Historic District, Balboa Park, and on the Market Place trails along- side the harbor near the hotel. Surely participants found attending the three-day 2011 National Annual Meeting an eponymous preview to the BSA’s Journey to Excellence. ¿


JOHN R. CLARK is Scouting magazine’s managing editor.


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