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Scouting’s Design Shines


You didn’t join Scouting for the awards, and neither did we. Still, we love getting


recognized for our work. Take Scouting maga- zine’s two 2011 Association of Educational Publishers’ Distinguished Achievement Awards, presented in June. Like the square knots on your uniform,


these awards show we’re on the right path toward achieving our mission: giving you the tools to lead, inspire, and explore.


Our September-October 2010 issue won awards in two design categories—Best Whole Publication Design and Best Article Design. The latter honored “The Troop Bully,” a story illustrated by Ralph Butler that told what to do if a Scout is intimidating others in your unit. Deserved kudos also


go to our design team of Scott Feaster and Elizabeth Morgan, as well as contrib- uting designer Robert Sugar.


DID YOU KNOW? Get Smartz


Technology has made it easier for young people to get mixed up in the wrong crowd. To help families navigate the Internet’s risky waters, the BSA has partnered with Netsmartz Workshop, a program of the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children. Check it out at netsmartz.org. “The landscape is constantly changing as far as risks to


children are concerned,” says John Patterson, the BSA’s Youth Protection consultant. “People who want to prey upon children have new tools to use.” NetSmartz provides resources to help young people have a


safe, enjoyable Internet experience. The site features real-life stories from kids, materials for peer training, and more. Scouts can take safety pledges, promising not to share personal infor- mation or meet face-to-face with anyone from the Internet. Michael Johnson, the BSA’s Youth Protection Director, says


the program draws on the knowledge of law enforcement offi- cials who track online predators. “They know the latest terms,


16 S COUTING ¿ SEPTEMBER•OCTOBER 2011


techniques, and strategies these individuals use,” he says. Johnson has learned from conversations with numerous


parents whose children were victimized by online predators. “They wish somebody had shared this information with them,” he says. “That’s what we’re doing in Scouting, and we couldn’t have chosen a better partner.”


MARK YOUR CALENDAR The Chat Pack


On Oct. 15-16, the 54th-Annual Jamboree on the Air (JOTA) will take place. Each year during this worldwide Scouting and amateur radio event, Scouts in 100 countries reach out to their peers via the airwaves. Many districts and councils hold events that coin- cide with JOTA; often, amateur radio operators set up stations for the Scouts to use. It’s a great chance to start a friendship with someone who may live half a world away but shares the bond of Scouting. JOTA is the largest Scouting


event in the world. The World Scout Bureau reported that the 2010 JOTA drew more than 700,000 Scout participants. For detailed instructions on how to participate, go to scouting.org/jota.aspx. A related event, Jamboree on the Internet, occurs the


same weekend. Find info at scouting.org/filestore/intl/ pdf/130-883_BW.pdf.


RALPH BUTLER


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