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SHOUT OUT


Hornaday, Times Two


Call John Washburn on an average afternoon, and you might find him out in the Chattahoochee National Recreation Area of Georgia, pulling exotic invasive wisteria. That’s just an everyday activity for the


young man who recently accomplished a remarkable feat. Washburn, who turned 22 in August, is the first person since the program began in 1914 to win both the bronze and silver William T. Hornaday Awards in the same year. The Hornaday Awards, which have been called “an Olympic medal


bestowed by the earth,” launched in 1914 to recognize those who make significant contributions to conservation. Dr. Hornaday, founder of the National Zoo in Washington, D.C., was a leader in saving the American bison from extinction. Washburn took an early interest in the environment thanks to his


father, who encouraged him to start working on related merit badges at the age of 11. Sadly, the elder Washburn died when John was 13, just hours after the boy received his Eagle Award. As part of his work for the


Hornaday Awards, John helped


remove invasive exotic plants such as Chinese blackberry. He also mapped a stream in Georgia’s Stone Mountain Park. “They knew where it ended, but they didn’t know where it came from,” John says. “I walked the woods until I found the source, and I also pointed out possible sources of pollution.” Last summer, he completed a


10-week volunteer internship with the


National Park Service. During the internship, he removed invasive plants and created an ozone garden at the Chattahoochee recreation area. Then he attended the World Scout Jamboree in Sweden. Today, John is pursuing a degree from Ogeechee Technical College and living in Georgia. Having compiled an impressive résumé of vol- unteer work, he says he’s ready to get a degree. “I wanted to get my hands dirty before sitting in a classroom.”


Inside A New Guide The revised Guide to Safe Scouting is now available at scouting.org/ filestore/pdf/34416.pdf. Here are two important areas to review:


The Injury Report


Unit-level volunteers must report to their council any incident that requires treatment beyond Scout- rendered first aid. If, say, a cut finger or a twisted ankle is treated on site, no report is required. If a cut finger requires a visit to the doctor and stitches, the report must be submitted along with any relevant photographs, doctors’ forms, etc. Find the Incident Information Report at scouting.org/ HealthandSafety/Forms.aspx.


The Sweet 16


September is National Preparedness Month. Check out “The Sweet 16 of BSA Safety,” which includes advice about Qualified Supervision, Personal Safety Equipment, and First Aid Resources. Find The Sweet 16 at scout ing.org/scoutsource/HealthandSafety/ Resources/sweet16.aspx.


ADVISORY


MY PROJECT


COURTESY OF FRANCES VOLL


COURTESY OF JULIA MERRIAM


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