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WHAT WOULD YOU DO? A Bit of a Fixer-Upper


Ideas from the field: Correcting pack meeting problems.


Scouter D.K. visited a pack meeting with no Pledge of Allegiance, no parent recognition and no standing for the national anthem. He asks for tactful ways to mention these shortcomings.


SHOW THEN TELL The first thing I would do is stand for the national anthem, especially if I was the only one standing. Then, if I knew the leader of the unit, I would confront him or her. If I didn’t know the leader, I would seek advice from either the district commissioner or the district executive.


Cubmaster B.A. GARDEN RIDGE, TEXAS


SUMMON THE COACH Find that unit’s commissioner and talk to him about it. It’s


NEXT QUESTION PASSING THE TORCH


Despite two years of succession planning, my pack can’t find replacements for the Cubmaster, pack committee chair and other leaders whose sons are moving on to Boy Scouting. I wonder how I might get a new generation


of leaders to step forward. C.S.


RALEIGH, N.C.


WE WANT YOUR SOLUTIONS! Send your answers by visiting scoutingmagazine.org/WWYD. We also solicit new questions and pay $50 for each one used in this column. Or send your submissions to Scouting magazine, P.O. Box 152079, Irving, TX 75015-2079.


20 SCOUTING ¿ NOVEMBER•DECEMBER 2014


his job to be the friendly coach to the unit leader. There may be a reason those elements have not yet been implemented, and he may already be working on it.


Pack Committee Member E.F. CHICAGO, ILL.


EXPLAINING TO DO I think certain parts of a meeting can be skipped if there is a time constraint; however, the Pledge should never be skipped. As for parent recognition, maybe a couple of the boys did not have parents present, so the pack did not want to make them feel leſt out by having everyone else’s parents come up for the award. If you were really upset by it, talk to the leader aſter the meeting and ask his reasoning.


Assistant Scoutmaster M.R. KEESEVILLE, N.Y.


IN MY COUNCIL … I would take aside the Cubmaster and the pack com-


mittee chairman and begin a friendly conversation with, “I know different councils do things differently, but in my council … ” Mention that it is customary to say the Pledge of Allegiance at the start of a meeting and to stand during the national anthem and that rank advancement takes the Scout as well as their parents, so we should recognize both.


Troop Committee Member D.H. LEE’S SUMMIT, MO.


HELP WANTED? I would ask to meet with the Cubmaster and committee members to offer to help them conduct a better pack meeting. A pack meeting should include these ele- ments, and I would explain to them why.


S.G. AUSTIN, TEXAS


ALL THAT JAZZ Was it a friend or family member’s pack? If the friend or family member is a leader, ask if he or she would be open to some help to “jazz up” their meetings. (If not, drop the subject.) Ask if they know about the position-


specific training online; it’s helpful in making for great meetings. The risk is that you don’t want to get uninvited in the future because they feel like you’re “grading” their kid’s pack.


Pack Trainer T.S. BRISTOW, VA.


STAY OUT OF IT I would simply mind my own business.


Scoutmaster K.B. O’FALLON, MO.


SET THE EXAMPLE First, set the example by standing up for the Pledge and clapping for recognition. Then, speak to the Cubmaster aſterwards. Encourage him to have his pack set the example. Have the Cub Scouts stand up and clap for each other to set the example, and encour- age other parents to do the same. It’s all about starting the trend. If no one does it, nothing will change.


OA Troop Representative S.C. OREFIELD, PA.


GO UP THE CHAIN Assuming that you are not this pack’s unit commissioner, bring it up to the district


JASON SCHNEIDER


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