This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
DEVELOPING SCOUTING’S PHILANTHROPIC FOUNDATION OD JoeCrafton


His aim: Leave Scouting better than he found it.


F


or Joe Crafton, one of the most valuable benefits he got from Scouting was learning to work effectively with many


different kinds of people with dif- ferent backgrounds and beliefs. “My ability to deal with diversity, whether it’s cognitive diversity or background diversity, is one of my strengths,” says the chief executive officer of Dallas- based Crossmark, a century-old leader in sales and marketing services with 35,000 employees. He acquired that useful business skill in part by leading fellow Scouts from Troop 57 in Memphis, Tenn. — they called it “Heinz 57” for the heterogeneity of its members — in projects including building cooking fires and constructing rope bridges. “In the community I grew up in, we all had very similar backgrounds. Scouting introduced me to people who were dif- ferent from me,” he says. “It shaped my ability to work with a diverse group to achieve common goals.” When Crafton received his Eagle


Scout Award in 1978, he took an oath to give back more to Scouting than he’d gotten. Since then, he has tried to fulfill that promise. He has devoted countless hours as a Scoutmaster, Wood Badge staffer,


Crafton’s sons, (from upper left) James, David and Reeves, join him during the dedication of the Joe Crafton Sportsman’s Complex at the Summit Bechtel Reserve in West Virginia. When the con- struction is complete, the six-building structure will offer Scouts an opportunity to learn shooting sports as well as important conservation lessons.


KEVIN PERRY


PHOTO EARTH, LLC, FAYETTEVILLE, W.VA. (2)


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52