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GREAT GEAR Gifts to Go


Gear guru Stephen Regenold offers these eight ideas for the active individuals on your list.


THERMACELLMR-GJ $30, THERMACELL.COM It’s never too early to prepare for bug season. This small device clips onto your belt or backpack and emits an invisible, bug-eschewing cloud of U.S. EPA-approved allethrin, a synthetic repellent bugs can’t stand. The claim is that the ThermaCELL repels “up to 98 percent of mosquitoes” in a 15-by-15-foot zone.


SHERPA 50


ADVENTURE KIT $450,GOALZERO.COM This three-piece portable power station can run or recharge almost any electronic device you may need in the backcountry, from a notebook computer to a GPS device. With the capacity to deliver 50 watts of power, the 2.2-pound unit is “equivalent to 30,000 AA batteries,” the company says. It comes with a foldable solar panel to top off the power pack in camp via sunlight.


TITANIUM SPORK $15, INDUSTRIALREV.COM The Light My Fire Titanium Spork offers an eat- anything spoon-fork-knife combo utensil for devouring nearly any foodstuff on the trail. There’s a spoon scoop, fork tines, and a small cutting edge to saw off bites if your backwoods steak gets overcooked. Bonus: It’s made of titanium, meaning the spork is tough and so light, at 20 grams, that you’ll never notice it in the mess kit.


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WENGERMIKEHORNKNIFE $240, WENGERNA.COM Meld a Swiss Army Knife with a multitool and slap on the seal of approval from one of the world’s great living explorers—and you have the Mike Horn Knife, a half-pound über-tool with two blades, pliers, a stock of implements, and handles made with a plastic hybrid material containing chips of repurposed wood. It was designed by Wenger and Mike Horn, an explorer currently on a four-year, round-the-world expedition, and it’s touted as “the only knife you’ll ever need” in the outdoors.


JOHN R. FULTON JR. (2); MODEL: RUGER


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