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Developing Scouting’s Philanthropic Foundation


Wayne&Christine T


As longtime Scouters, the Perrys have insight into how to ramp up the adrenaline among significant donors.


he seeds of Wayne Perry’s investment with Scouting as an adult leader and supporter began when he was a Cub Scout in Seattle


and his mother and father were his Webelos leaders. “Then I went on to Scouting,” he recalls, “and the troop disbanded when I was a Second Class Scout.” Wayne describes what happened as a failure of leadership. “The leaders basically stopped showing up after their kids got their Eagle,” he says. “It wasn’t the end of the world. But it always got me about the failure of adults letting kids down.” Wayne, a retired businessman and part


owner of the Seattle Mariners Major League Baseball team, has never stopped showing up for Scouting. His early experiences left him with “a great feeling for Scouting.” That feeling became more concrete when his wife, Christine, came home from church one day with the news that she had volunteered him to be Cubmaster. “And then when you have four boys, you just keep rolling,” he says. “You’re a Cubmaster, then they get to Scouts and you’re assistant Scoutmaster, and then you’re a Scoutmaster.” Wayne went on to join the district committee


and then became vice president of the council, area president, regional vice president, regional president, and a member of the National Executive Board. Wayne also spent three years as interna- tional commissioner of the Boy Scouts of America, beginning in 2006, and as a member of the World Scout Committee. Currently, he is national presi- dent-elect of the Boy Scouts of America. Brimming with passion for Scouting, Wayne tells an endless supply of stories—often punctuated with his trademark “By gumbo!” expression— about how campouts, merit badges, and challenging activities transform regular kids into dynamic leaders. “The program, which is teach- ing kids character and leadership skills—while kind of hiding it in a fun outdoor program—is a


KEVIN PERRY


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