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DID YOU KNOW? Raise Your ‘Voice’


In 2012, Scouting will begin a program to stay connected with the experiences of members. Called Voice of the Scout, this program will allow Scouts age 14 and older, parents, volunteers, and chartered organizations to share their insights, which will help shape the BSA program, managerial, and operational decisions going forward. As the BSA’s first nationwide survey program, Voice of the Scout will validate


the expectations of members through e-mail surveys. But, don’t worry, the goal isn’t to flood your inbox. Eligible members will receive an e-mail survey about once every six months. “The Voice of the Scout is based on a highly respected program that has been


used to help grow numerous Fortune 500 companies in the last decade,” says Mike Watkins, Voice of the Scout program manager. “Our immediate intent will be to dis- cover trends in the Scouting experience, then preserve what is working, and change what isn’t. It will be a very powerful tool to impact retention and ultimately growth.” To help organize your survey feedback, a permissions-based online dashboard


for volunteers and professionals is also under development. Beginning in 2012, members of councils that opt-in to the program will begin receiving surveys. In 2013, Voice of the Scout will reach nationwide and serve as a key performance indicator within the Journey to Excellence recognition system. “I firmly believe that by listening to our various customer groups, we can dra- matically enhance the Scouting program,” says David Weekley, Southern Region president. “This will lead to better programming and, thus, retention, increased membership, and impact on our communities. It will help us positively impact the lives and characters of millions of youth.”


THIS JUST IN


What Gets Your Scouts Ahead


The revised “Guide to Advancement” is now the official BSA source on advance- ment—the biggest such revision in about 20 years, says Christopher Hunt, team leader of advancement. This change brings clarity and easy-to-


access advancement details to Scouts, Scouters, and parents, says Hunt. Among the many revisions in the guide, Hunt notes an important change to the Eagle Scout project requirement. Instead of requiring that a project plan be approved before the Scout begins work on the project, a proposal is now required. “Many Scouts are spending a great deal of time on the plan only to have it rejected,” says Hunt. “A proposal allows Scouts to get approval and then complete the final plan later.”


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JEFF DOW/BSA FILES


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