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likely to miss a monthly deadline for getting his project proposal reviewed. “Knowing how the district works and knowing the people who were there, I was also able to tell this boy, ‘Call the district advancement chairman — here’s his number — and explain your situation. They will work with you,’ ” he says. The Scout took Sparks’ sug- gestion and was able to get his project approved at a special time. If you’re just starting out as a


Life-to-Eagle coordinator, consider asking to see completed Eagle project workbooks that have been approved or returned for revisions. After review- ing a handful of workbooks, you’ll quickly get an idea of what your dis- trict wants to see. Although being a Life-to-Eagle


coordinator has its challenges — including birthday-eve visits from 11th-hour Eagles — Dorn thinks she has the best position in her troop. She especially enjoys reading the statements of ambitions and life purpose that Scouts must write as part of Requirement No. 6. Often, she says, “I’m just blown away.”


For Keller, the highlight comes


at the end of the process. “It’s sitting back after the Eagle court of honor is over and watching the proud parents and the proud Eagle Scouts taking their family pictures,” he says. They’re photos that might never be


taken without the support of the Life- to-Eagle coordinator. ¿


Eagle Scout MARK RAY, author of The Scoutmaster’s Other Handbook, writes regularly for Scouting and Eagles’ Call magazines.


FIND A TOOLBOX of items to help you encourage Scouts on the road to Eagle, including how to find service-project ideas, helpful tips on tool-use guidelines during project construction and much more at scoutingmagazine.org/lifetoeagle.


Hurry, 18th birthday approaching fast!


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