This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
GROUND RULES by cli f f jacobson Camp in Comfort These two “C” words are not mutually exclusive. Here’s why.


IN HIS BOOK, Camping and Woodcraft (1917), Horace Kephart wrote that he took to the woods not to “rough it,” but to “smooth the way.” Kephart believed that expert skills and appro- priate gear were the keys to comfort in the wild outdoors. And you should never be miserable on a camping trip, either. So here are some tips for camping in comfort.


Protect the Head Bring more hats than you think you’ll need. These three will keep you prepared for any weather: a broad- brimmed canvas hat (preferred) or ball cap for sun, a wool stock- ing cap for cold, and a waterproof “sou’wester” for rain. In cold weather, bring along a wool bala- clava for use as a neck warmer and/or sleeping helmet.


Buy Clothes Big Long-sleeved shirts and sweaters should be a full size larger than your city clothes. Rain jackets and shells should be larger still, and cut full—like an Inuit winter parka—so that they will fit over bulky clothes. Sleeves should be wide for ease of movement. Zippers should close high on the neck so icy air can’t chill your chest; most parkas leave a gap at the throat when they’re zipped up. And, more often than not, underarm zippers will leak in heavy rain—even those claiming to be waterproof.


Go With Wool Always bring a long-sleeve wool shirt and lightweight long johns, even in the summer. Wool has a


50 SCOUTING ¿  


greater temperature comfort range versus synthetics. It’s more breathable, and it doesn’t develop obnoxious odors. If you think you’re allergic to wool, you haven’t tried Merino wool from Australia and New Zealand. Tip: You can shrink-fit military surplus woolens to fit small kids if you cook the woolens in boiling water for five minutes and then dry them with high heat. For centuries lobster fisher- men used this “shrink-fit” procedure to make their woolens water-resistant.


Sit When Possible Camp chores—cooking, washing dishes, tending the fire—go easier when you don’t sit on the ground. So, bring a folding stool. One variety has a backrest and zippered storage pouch, and it sits on two parallel aluminum rails that won’t sink into the ground. When not in use, it folds


SHARE YOUR SECRETS for camping in comfort at scouting magazine.org/campcomfort.





Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64