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Sun protection, sweat wicking, warmth,


and, yes, even aesthetics dictate my chapeau du jour. So from billed waterproof rain hats to a pseudo-bandana called a Buff, my headwear picks here—some of my favorites on the market—will keep your noggin covered.¿


STEPHEN REGENOLD is founder and editor of GearJunkie.com.


WATCH A VIDEO demonstrating the many ways to wear a Buff at scoutingmagazine.org/buff.


MAY•JUNE 2012 ¿ S COUTING


47


MOUNTAIN HARDWEAR


DOWNPOUR BASEBALL CAP $25, MOUNTAINHARDWEAR.COM Waterproof even in hard rain, the close- fitting Downpour cap works as a great stand-in for an umbrella. The cap’s body keeps your head dry, and the big brim keeps raindrops out of your eyes. An absorbing band around the inside of the cap wicks sweat when you’re on the move.


OUTDOOR RESEARCH


SUN RUNNER CAP $32, OUTDOORRESEARCH.COM This skirt-equipped cap is essential for sunny environments such as the Utah desert; its UV-blocking fabric will keep your neck and ears from getting burned. Mesh side panels provide breezy airflow. And the skirt snaps on and snaps off, letting you ditch the Lawrence of Arabia look once you’re off the trail and back to civilization.


UV BUFF $23, BUFFUSA.COM “Seamless, multifunctional headwear.” That’s what Buff calls its fabric-tube headwear product. Strange as it sounds, these neo-bandanas, popularized by Survivor, give you a wide variety of uses across a range of temperatures. Some even offer UV protection. You can wear them in a dozen ways—from beanie-style, to sweatband, to a do-rag look that even a pro wrestler could love.


JOHN R. FULTON JR. (4); MODEL: BRENT ANDERSON


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