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GREAT GEAR by stephen regenold Take Cover


Put a lid on it with hats designed to keep you more comfortable on the trail.


RAIN, SUN, WIND, or cool temps: The ever- mercurial great outdoors demands that serious wilderness wanderers own a rack of caps. Any billed hat can shade eyes. But if you’re ven- turing into true wilds, a small investment in “technical” headwear can reap a big ROI.


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TILLEY OUTBACK HATA $79, TILLEY.COM Indiana Jones types will want to invest in an Outback Hat, a broad- brimmed swashbuckler that employs waxed cotton in its stout, water- resistant build. It’s rated for UPF 50+ protection, and a dark under-brim fabric all but eliminates glare. The company offers a lifetime guarantee and a promise that the Outback Hat can be “washed, worn, packed, used, and abused” ad infinitum outdoors and around the globe.


STORMY KROMER CAP $35, STORMYKROMER.COM Classic! This decades-old design fits tight to the head and offers ear protection with a headband that pulls down if the winds pick up. Wool and nylon constitute its handsome and sturdy fabric blend. A signature lace tie in front gives a micro- adjustment for fit. Made in the USA and designed to last for years.


ORIGINAL WOOL


HEADSWEATS SUPERVISOR $20, HEADSWEATS.COM Like a sweatband with a brim, the Supervisor offers a moisture-sucking cloth band and a stout little bill to keep the sun out of your eyes. Its topless approach (beloved by Ironman triathletes) offers ultimate airflow for outdoorsmen who don’t mind their dome exposed to the sun.


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