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DEVELOPING SCOUTING’S PHILANTHROPIC FOUNDATION OD


Craig&MaryFenn C


Supporting the relevance of Scouting to at-risk youth.


raig Fenneman’s family involvement with Scouting stretches back nearly


a century, to the dawn of the Boy Scouts of America when his grandfather founded a troop in 1914 in Evansville, Ind. Since then, Craig, his father, three brothers, and a son all have become Eagle Scouts. And like his grandfather before him, Craig is the recipient of the Silver Beaver award, recognizing his service as an adult volunteer to the Scouting movement. He


also received the Distinguished Eagle Scout Award. “It’s been a great adven-


ture,” Craig says of his Scouting experience. Today, he leads Southern Bells Inc., one of the country’s largest franchisers of Taco Bell, Pizza Hut, and KFC restaurants, and serves as a member of the BSA’s National Foundation Board. He also serves on the board of trustees for Butler University, his alma mater, and takes leadership roles in other youth-oriented organizations. He credits much of this life of extraordi- nary achievement to what he learned from Scouting. “One of my first oppor- tunities to be in a leadership position was in Boy Scouts,” Craig says. “After that, I became president of student government in high school and president of student gov- ernment in college. It gave me a confidence that has taken me through my life.” Now as significant sup-


porters of Scouting, Craig and his wife, Mary, work to ensure that other boys benefit from the same opportunities he had. While a lot has changed since his grandfather was organizing his first troop, Craig believes


Scouting is a family affair for Craig and Mary Fenneman (above), who join a group of Scouts outdoors at their Indiana property. The couple’s son, Brent Fenneman, an Eagle Scout (back row, left), joins his father and other Scouts for an afternoon hike.


MARY ANN CARTER (3)


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