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family more than two years ago as a way to explore Minnesota parks. “Arr,” broke in Jack, smiling

through gritted teeth, “and I’m a pirate!” An electronics-driven treasure

hunt, geocaching combines sleuthing and hiking. From “geo” for geogra- phy and “caching” for hiding goods, geocaching has gained a worldwide following since it began in 2000. It started when the U.S. Defense Department, which controls the global satellite navigation system, stopped scrambling satellite position signals. This allowed GPS users far more accurate data than they had ever had in the past to mark such sights as hot fishing holes. To test the devices’ navigational

possibilities, some began leaving goods in the woods and posting the coordinates on the Internet for others to find. Such computer-directed trek- king instantly took off. Today there are nearly a million caches worldwide in more than 200 countries—from Argentina to Zimbabwe—tracked at geocaching.com, the game’s Internet center. Now geocaching is the centerpiece

dampen 7-year-old Cub Scout Jack Parry’s enthusiasm for treasure hunting. Attending Cub Scout Adventure Day at Gamehaven Scout Reservation, a 266-acre camp just outside of Rochester, Minn., he made a beeline past the tomahawk toss, BB gun targets, and archery range directly to the lodge marked “Geocaching.”

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N AN UNSEASONABLE

40-degree day in early October, not even a constant drizzle could

New to most of the 100

Gamehaven Council Cub Scouts and their parents at the event, geocach- ing uses Global Positioning System handhelds to find pre-established way- points where others have left a “cache,” or hidden container full of prizes, for them to take. Unlike most fellow Cub Scouts, Jack of Stewartville’s Pack 156 brought his own GPS unit. “When we started, we called it ‘trea-

sure hunting,’” said Jack’s father, Jim Parry, who began geocaching with his

of the Boy Scouts of America’s new Get in the Game! program. Part of the Scouts’ 100th Anniversary Celebration, Get in the Game! uses geocaching to spread the word about Scouting by creating geocaches that highlight Scouts’ contributions to the com- munity. It also aims to engage with thousands of geocachers across the country and get youth—both existing Scouts and potential new recruits— enthused about Scouting. “No young person joins Scouting

to have their character developed,” said Bob Mersereau, director of the Scouts’ 100th Anniversary Celebration Project. “They join because it’s fun, and geocaching is just that.” Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60
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