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Robbie Frazee of Troop 325 (this page, left) sets the jib as his small crew learns to sail a racing boat. Back on land, Scouts and leaders (above) break into teams for hands-on learning about sails and boats. To practice sailing techniques, Scouts use technol- ogy old and new, including wind diagrams and knot-tying iPad apps. In-person instruction is still the best, though, as Chelsie Bilger (opposite page, top) proves during a sail-rigging demo with Scouts Robert Aycock and Frazee. Sea Scout Base staffers Devon Carter (opposite page, top right), Program Commissioner Alex Freas (opposite page, middle) and Capt. Scott Harrison (opposite page, bottom) give participants the needed time and attention.


Platinum certification, the highest for green build- ings. Programs include kayaking, small- and large-boat sailing and powerboating for Boy Scouts, Venturers and Sea Scouts, plus maritime education for mature Scouts and interns presented in a 110-foot, two-story floating classroom ship called the BaySmart Express. With an estimated total financial investment,


including construction, boats and operating endowment, approaching $100 million, Sea Scout Base-Galveston rivals almost any Scout facility. “It is a tremendous project, and it is going to make a big splash in the high-adventure community,” Herrera says.


ONE OF THE BASE’S most striking features is the extent to which it is the product of the vision and resources of one couple. Charles and Rosemary Doolin became involved in Scouting in 2002 when their son joined a Sea Scout ship near their Dallas home. Charles soon became deeply immersed in boating, ultimately earning a master’s license from the U.S. Coast Guard for vessels up to 100 tons or around 90 feet long. With their Sea Scout Ship 77 leaders and youth,


the Doolins began acquiring a number of boats and hosting Sea Scouts on a variety of sailing expeditions. In 2006, they bought an 82-foot former Coast Guard cutter, the Point Glass, in Galveston. After purchasing the vessel, the Doolins searched for a deep-water base from which to launch adventure trips aboard Point Glass. A dock launch was purchased in Offatts Bayou, but Hurricane Ike thwarted construction of a pier. Not long after, Charles contacted Herrera, and plans for


26 S COUTING ¿ MARCH•APRIL 2014


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