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level countertops at the snack bar to quarterly sensory-friendly movie screenings for kids with autism (during which they turn up the lights and turn down the sound). That Scout also came away with an increased


awareness of accessibility issues. Two months after he completed the badge, he approached Krejcha on a campout with ideas about how the camp could be made more accessible. Advocacy — turning ideas into action —


might be the hardest part of the badge. Boys who’ve never advocated for themselves can have a hard time advocating for others, which they must do for Requirement 5. Krejcha says his Scouts usually choose option A and make a disabilities-awareness presentation to a Cub Scout pack or other group. Many of Luke’s par- ticipants, meanwhile, end up volunteering at Easter Seals (option B) because they’re already familiar with the facility and staff. Ultimately, though, the badge is about atti-


tudes as much as action. If Scouts learn to see the person first and the disability second (if at all), they’ve earned far more than a merit badge. ¿


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