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DURING TENSE DECADES OF OVERSEAS conflicts, Cold War tensions, the Space Race, and unprecedented turmoil on campuses, Scouting helped many Scouters keep boys grounded in the values of the Scout Law and Scout Oath. Read more from the ’50s and ’60s coming soon at scoutingmagazine.org/archives.


“Too often, we leaders feel that we are public benefactors with just a trace of martyr when we finally agree to take the biggest job in scouting, that of Scoutmaster. The fact is that we owe these Scouts a debt on which we can’t even pay the interest for keeping youth in our hearts, a sparkle


in our eyes, and a spring in our step. “ CHESTER C. BURDICK, COMMISSIONER, CHICAGO, ILL., 1945


1950s 30


Need money for the 1950 Valley Forge jamboree? “Why not try a dad-prepared pancake supper or a Scout-cooked bean feed? People like to eat, [and] they want to see a home-town boy get this great Jamboree experience.”


SCOUTING ¿  


A Scoutmaster finds crime comic books lying on his Scouts’ bunks. He’s offended by the comics’ “callous, cynical attitude toward the law” and “their sinister preoccupation with the abnormal.”


In “If Communists Wrote the Scout Law,” we learn what would happen to the 12 points if communism reigned. For instance: “A Scout is Loyal—but the only loyalty he knows is blind subservience to the state and its teaching.”


A BSA professional visits Alaska just after it becomes the 49th state, and he’s shocked by the high cost of living there. “A typical restaurant breakfast—juice, one egg, bacon, toast, and coffee—costs $2.29!”


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