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NOW HEAR THIS Talking About Cancer


April is Testicular Cancer Awareness Month, and while many people might not asso- ciate cancer with boys and young men, the BSA’s medical coordinator, Ruth Reynolds, says it’s the most common type of cancer in males 15 to 35 years old. Reynolds acknowledges


that testicular cancer is not an easy subject to talk about with Scouts—and that’s part of the problem. “There’s no real awareness movement,” she says. “It’s one of the most treatable cancers if detected early, but almost nobody talks about it.” That was the experience of


Eric Lindgren, 20, a member of Crew 336, Longhorn (Tex.)


GOOD READ


The Giggling Gourmets


So two comedians walk into a campsite full of hungry Scouters and say, “Hey, instead of hot dogs, let’s have pecan- crusted chicken or Dutch oven Benedict!” Sound good? It’s no joke, as you’ll


discover in Ultimate Camp Cooking, a cookbook written by professional comics Mike Faverman and Pat Mac, who teamed up to divulge secrets about cooking delicious, satisfying meals outdoors. The durable, flexi-bound book holds more than 80 recipes, including regional favorites, foods from various cul- tures, desserts, and more. As for presentation, Faverman and Mac pepper their


pages with lively stories that will add a pinch of fun to your campfire feast. Available for $15 at bookstores or at ultimatecampcooking.com.


10 S COU T I N G ¿ MA R C H • A P R I L 2 0 1 1


Council, who was diagnosed with testicular cancer last year. Multiple tumors spread throughout his body, and his weight dropped from 160 to 98 pounds. “We really didn’t know what the problem was at first,” Eric says. “They thought it might be bronchitis or stomach infections. Nobody looked for cancer in someone 19 years old.” Experts say that testicular


cancers typically grow slowly. Symptoms can include pain, a feeling of heaviness in the scrotal area, and a dull ache in the lower back and abdomen. A testicle may be enlarged—but not always. And sometimes there are no early symptoms. All the


Eric (left) and Scott Lindgren.


more reason to talk about this “silent” killer. Find information on recogniz- ing symptoms at this site: health.google.com/health/ref/ Testicular+self-examination. After intensive treatment, Eric has received a “great


SHOUT OUT Boys’ Life Centennial


This March, the official magazine of the Boy Scouts of America turns 100 years old. Yes, for one century Boys’ Life has enthralled gen-


erations of readers with practical advice for Scouters, thrilling stories of adventure and survival, and great tales from famous writers such as Jack London and Ray Bradbury. You’ll find the


whole story of BL’s origins and its extraor- dinary impact on Scouting in Scouting magazine’s May-June issue. If you want the scoop on BL, don’t miss it! And you can still


order The Best of Boys’ Life ($21.95) from Lyons Press, a division of Globe Pequot Press (globepequot.com).


prognosis” and is on the path to returning to school, says his father, Scott Lindgren. “The main thing is to get the word out,” Scott says. “If we can stop one boy from getting in such bad shape before he is diag- nosed, all of this is worth it.”


NANCY LINDGREN


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