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end of a rope. His or her friend holds the other end of the rope and acts as the motorboat, pulling the wakeboarder around the room. To keep his balance, the wakeboarder must hold what’s essentially a bodyweight squat for the length of the ride. “This is the stuff of athleticism,” Brown says. “It requires balance and strength, it involves relationship building and the kids aren’t worried about how they are performing.” Kids can make it even more challeng- ing by balancing on one leg.


BATTLE CRAWL. Partners get on all fours on the grass facing each other. Both players must move using only hands and feet; knees must stay off the ground. One partner tries to reach a goal line or object while the other tries to block his move- ment. After reaching the goal, the partners switch sides. The game builds leg, arm and core strength, as well as cardiovascular endurance. Kids love a time-based challenge,


says Jack, who recommends building obstacle courses as a way to motivate kids to move more. Indoors, set up


cardboard boxes to crawl through and a row of chairs to climb over. String a web of yarn to step through during a timed-race format. Outdoors, create a boot-camp-style fitness course of stations where kids must do a certain number of tasks for time, such as basketball tosses or calisthenics. “The perfect exercise,” Brown says, “is a rigor- ous activity in which kids lose all sense of time because it’s so much fun.” ¿


JEFF CSATARI is the author of the New York Times best-seller The Belly Off! Diet.


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