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ADVANCEMENT FAQs


they go on band trips, it’s co-ed. They’re doing that all the time anyway, so I don’t think it’s anything to be leery of. It was never an issue for us.


WHAT LESSONS DID YOU LEARN ABOUT PLANNING INTERNATIONAL TRIPS? THOMAS: First, from a logistics standpoint, a good sweet spot for an international trip is somewhere between 12 and 15 participants, topping out at 16. Second, you’ve got to look at those medical forms. You are 24 to 36 hours away from home if you have to send somebody back to the United States because of a medical emergency.


WHAT ABOUT CONTROLLING COSTS? THOMAS: Early on, someone has to start calling airlines and checking airfares. If they have a sale, try to take advantage of that. And get out of the Sunday-through-Saturday mindset. Airfares are often cheaper Tuesdays and Wednesdays, so travel midweek.


FINALLY, HOW DO VENTURERS (AND ADULTS) BENEFIT FROM INTER- NATIONAL TRIPS? AGUIRRE: They get a broader perspective on what Scouting’s all about and on the world we live in. They see the worldwide Scouting movement firsthand. Even though Scouting may be different elsewhere, Scouts still operate under the same general principles. They still practice Scout skills, they still wear a uniform, and they still do things the way we do in the United States. ¿


TO LEARN MORE about Kandersteg International Scout Centre, visit kisc.ch.


Beyond Sports Denali Award offers another mountain to climb.


SINCE VARSITY SCOUTING uses so much sports termi- nology—Varsity Scouts join teams, elect captains, and earn letters—many Scouters think the program focuses strictly on sports. The Denali Award, introduced in 2001, disproves that notion and shows just how closely Varsity Scouting is tied to its cousin, Boy Scouting. It also gives Varsity Scouts another mountain to climb on the trail to Eagle.


WHAT DOES THE NAME MEAN? Denali is the name American Indians gave to Alaska’s Mount McKinley, the highest peak in North America.


WHO CAN EARN THE DENALI AWARD? Any Varsity Scout who has already earned the Varsity Scout letter.


CAN DENALI AWARD RECIPI- ENTS STILL EARN VARSITY LETTER BARS? Yes.


WHAT ARE THE DENALI AWARD REQUIREMENTS? Find them in the “Guide to Advancement” (No. 3308, section 4.2.2.2) and in the Varsity Scout Guidebook (No. 34827), but here’s a quick summary: 1)


Be a registered Varsity Scout. 2) Advance one rank toward Eagle. 3) Serve in Varsity Scout leadership positions for six months. 4) Act as the primary leader of at least two activities and demonstrate shared leadership by serving in a supporting role for other activities. 5) Satisfy the team captain that you know and live by the Varsity Scout Pledge. 6) Complete a prog- ress review.


REQUIREMENT NO. 2 SAYS THE SCOUT MUST ADVANCE ONE RANK TOWARD EAGLE. WHAT IF HE ALREADY IS AN EAGLE? He can earn an Eagle Palm.


WHO SITS ON THE DENALI AWARD BOARD OF REVIEW? The advancement program manager, who is under the direction of the adult program adviser, and other team committee members lead the board of review. District and/or council repre- sentatives are not involved.


WHAT RECOGNITION ITEMS ARE AVAILABLE? The Denali Award medal (No. 4199) con- sists of a pewter medallion suspended from a brown and


red cloth ribbon. It’s worn above the left pocket.


IS THERE A POCKET PATCH OR SQUARE KNOT? No.


WHAT’S THE SIGNIFICANCE OF THE FIVE STARS ON THE MEDALLION? They represent Varsity Scouting’s five fields of emphasis: advancement, high adventure/sports, per- sonal development, service, and special programs and events.


IS THE DENALI AWARD THE HIGHEST RANK IN VARSITY SCOUTING? No. Varsity Scouting uses the Boy Scout ranks, so Eagle Scout is the highest rank. Think of the Denali Award as a recognition on the way to Eagle (or after the Eagle rank is earned).


WHEN AND WHERE SHOULD THE AWARD BE PRESENTED? The Varsity Scout should receive his award as soon as possible after his board of review, perhaps in a simple ceremony at the end of a team meeting or on an outing. He should then be recognized more formally at the next court of honor. ¿


JANUARY•FEBRUARY 2012 ¿ S COUTING 15


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