This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
STAY SAFE Not-So-Hot Stoves


They’re cheap and lightweight, but they’re also dangerous. That’s why homemade alcohol stoves cannot be used in any Scouting activities. This rule was spelled out in the BSA’s 2009 Policy on the Storage, Handling, and Use of Chemical Fuels and Equipment, but it bears repeating in light of recent injury incidents. Richard Bourlon, Health and Safety team leader, points out


numerous hazards from the homemade stoves: They come without safety instructions; the cans aren’t designed for high- pressure contents and can rupture; and cans are often unstable, so a lighted stove could fall off a table and start a fire. Sven Rundman, a member of the National Health and Safety Support Committee, warns that alcohol fuel, commonly used in these stoves, burns clear and is hard to detect when spilled. Find more details in the “Guide to Safe Scouting” avail- able online at bit.ly/SafeStoves.


DID YOU KNOW? To Get, Get Back


Scouting Alumni: Take your commit- ment to the movement to the next level by joining the new Scouting Alumni Association. For annual dues of $35, asso- ciation members enjoy all the benefits of Alumni Connection plus extra perks such as bugle-call ringtones for their phones, a luggage tag, a free one-year membership to the National Scouting Museum, and much more. “When they do join, their local council will get their names and talk to them about Scouting locally,” says Bill Steele, the BSA’s director of alumni relations. Join today by visiting bsaalumni.org.


WANTED: READER FEEDBACK Do you have comments on an article appearing in this issue? Want to read what others are saying? Head to scoutingmagazine.org/letters to take a look at letters to the editor we’ve received in response to the Nov.-Dec. 2011 issue, and share your thoughts on the current edition.


  ¿ SCOUTING


13


JOHN R. FULTON JR.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56