This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
GREAT GEAR by s tephen regenold Sole Mates


Step up your game with socks that help you run, walk, or hike in comfort.


BEHOLD! THE HUMAN FOOT is a bio- mechanical masterpiece of muscles, tendons, and 26 bones. Feet support


WOOL RUNNER $14, wigwam.com Made for winter sports including running, snowshoeing, or fast hiking, the Silver Wool Runner socks mix warmth and a cushioned sole with an athletic cut. They are made primarily with a mix of itch-free merino wool and stretchy nylon. An integrated (read: permanent) antimicrobial treatment kills the microbes that cause foot odor before they begin to stink.


WIGWAM SILVER


your body, and they propel you on a hike. Buying a good pair of socks is the least you can do! You can skimp by in cotton tubes, but a pair of made-for- the-outdoors socks, though expensive, will function best on your feet. On a backpacking or camping


trip, you can wear the same pair of socks for two or more days in a row. Antimicrobial treatments aid in keeping socks stink-resistant.


LIGHT MINICREW $12.95, tekosocks.com Made of 100 percent post- consumer recycled polyester, these socks are soft and have better moisture management than wool. The Light MiniCrew has a seamless toe area and extra cushioning underfoot. It dries quickly when hung up in camp.


TEKO TEKOPOLY


Sock liners, those thin under-sock


polypro pieces popular years ago? They help some, but they’re unneces- sary for most feet. Indeed, be it blister prevention, warmth, wicking, mois- ture management, or performance enhancement, today’s outdoors socks can almost do it all. ¿


Outdoors writer STEPHEN REGENOLD is founder of GearJunkie.com.


MOTION QTR $8.99, foxsox.com With a mesh top for maximum breathability and a thin, form-fitting design, the Motion is perfect for fast hikers. The speedy sock contains Ingeo, a renewable, man-made fiber.


FOX RIVER


36


S COUTING ¿ JANUARY•FEBRUARY 2011


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56