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THE TRAINING THING Open-Water Winter


Leaders interested in Scuba certification for their youths have a new way to achieve their goals and maybe save some money in the bargain. The Florida National High Adventure Sea Base now offers “referral certification” to Scout troops and Venturing crews each spring. That means divers can do their classroom work and


confined-water work back home with an instructor who belongs to the Professional Association of Diving Instructors. The divers then come to Florida to complete their certification with the required open-water dives, after which they can enjoy several days of diving in the Florida Keys. It’s an option that might be especially attractive to those living in northern climes. “Do all the inside pool and classroom work back


home where it’s cold,” says Paul Beal, general manager at the Florida Sea Base. “Then spend the rest of your adventure diving America’s only living coral reef.” To reserve a spot, go to bsaseabase.org.


COLD CAMPING


Neither snow, nor rain … O.K., that’s the Postal Service, but the same all-weather camping ethic always has been part of Scouting. Starting in the mid-1970s, the three


northern high-adventure bases—Charles L. Sommers Wilderness Canoe Base (Minnesota), Northern Wisconsin National Canoe Base, and Maine National High Adventure Base—ran winter treks. The name and symbol for the programs was Okpik (ook’ pick), the Inuit word for the Snowy Owl. The programs in Wisconsin and


Maine were discontinued in 1984 and 1991, respectively, but Scouts still get their freeze on. Currently, Northern Tier (formed when the Sommers and Northern Wisconsin bases merged) offers seven different winter-camping programs. These include dog sledding, cross-country skiing, snowshoeing, and animal tracking.


PATCHES COURTESY OF ROY MORE ADVISORY


Attention, Sea Scouts


The new version of the Sea Scout Manual (Supply No. 33239), available at your local Scout shop, through the National Distribution Center, and at scoutstuff. org, posts new requirements for the four rank advance- ments for Sea Scouts—Apprentice, Ordinary, Able, and Quartermaster. There’s also a DVD with video footage showing how to tie all the Sea Scout knots, how to set up a land ship, and more. Watch for other changes at seascout.org. Also, get ready for the 100th Anniversary


of the Sea Scouts in 2012. If you have ideas for making this a super celebration, send them to: 100th Anniversary Celebration of Sea Scouts, National Council, Boy Scouts of America, SUM 250, 1325 W. Walnut Hill Ln., Irving, TX, 75038.


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S COUTING ¿ JANUARY•FEBRUARY 2011


THIS OLD PATCH


ROGER MORGAN/BSA FILES


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