This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
REPORT TO THE NATION


GOOD READ Back in the Day


Joe Davis followed in the steps of Scouting legends such as George Bullock and Jack Rhea. And he left some mighty big footprints of his own. Now, Davis’ colorful life in Scouting have been cap-


After crisscrossing our nation’s capital from one unfor- gettable site to the next, a group of nine delegates met President Barack Obama to hand-deliver the BSA’s official Report to the Nation. The report, given to the president annually, summarized Scouting’s 2010 accomplishments. Some highlights from last year: Scouts performed millions of volunteer hours, and a record number of boys achieved Eagle Scout—56,000. The delegates included (from left) National Order of the Arrow Chief Jonathan Hillis, National Venturing President Jennifer Lowe, Angel Luis Cabanilla, Tony DeMarco Hansberry II, and National Sea Scout Boatswain Vanya Marie Keyes. Also in the delegation, but not pictured, were Vasant Bhardwaj, Kevin Garcia, Solomon G. Goodwin, and Jace C. Taliaferro.


SHOUT OUT Schooled in Scouting


Jeff Parrett, a history teacher and Scout leader in Hauppauge Middle School, Long Island, N.Y., has found a way to keep Scouts active and interested. Parrett and colleague (and Eagle Scout) Marc Sledjeski created a homeroom/advisory class for Scouts only. The idea bloomed two years ago when Parrett’s son and other Scout friends would come to Parrett’s advi- sory class to work on merit badges. The school already permitted “special-interest” advisory classes for student council and other activities, so school administrators welcomed Parrett’s suggestion. Soon, he had 35 Scouts reporting for duty each


day. Between them, Parrett and Sledjeski are certified counselors for 13 merit badges. Parrett calls Scouting in school a “tremendous” benefit for his boys. “Before we started this, I had seven or eight boys telling me they were going to quit Scouts,” he said. “Two years later, we’ve already got a waiting list for next year.”


10 S COUTING ¿ MAY•JUNE 2011


tured in Carry On: The Life Adventures of Joe Davis, Former Director of Camping, Philmont Scout Ranch. Written by James E. Sundergill, Davis’ nephew-in-law, the book details Davis’ life from his Eagle Scout days in the 1920s to his tenure as Philmont’s director of camping from 1965 to 1973. Davis made his mark with


his successful response to Philmont’s devastating flood of 1965. He also launched the Rayado programs and led the way in hiring young women as Rangers. Carry On ($16) is avail-


able from the Philmont Staff Association. Order by phone (575-376-1138) or at store.


philstaff.com.


WHITE HOUSE PHOTO/PETER SOUZA


PHOTO CREDIT


MARC SLEDJESKI


sch “Be eigh quit alread Jeff Pa leader i Island, N active an (and Eag homeroom The


when Parre would come work on me permitted “sp for student co school admini suggestion. Soon, he


Long Island, N.Y., has found a way to keep Scouts active and interested. Parrett and colleague (and Eagle Scout) Marc Sledjeski created a homeroom/advisory class for Scouts only. The idea bloomed two years ago


J


when Parrett’s son and other Scout friends would come to Parrett’s advisory class to work on merit badges. The school already permitted “special-interest” advisory classes for student council and other activities, so school administrators welcomed Parrett’s suggestion. Soon, he had 35 Scouts reporting


for duty each day. Between them, Parrett and Sledjeski are certified counselors for 13 merit badges. Parrett calls Scouting in school a “tremendous” benefit for his boys. “Before we started this, I had seven or


eff Parrett, a history teacher and Scout leader in Hauppauge Middle School,


eight boys telling me they were going to quit Scouts,” he said. “Two years later, we’ve already got a waiting list for next year.” Jeff Parrett, a history teacher and Scout leader in Hauppauge Middle School, Long Island, N.Y., has found a way to keep Scouts active and interested. Parrett and colleague (and Eagle Scout) Marc Sledjeski created a homeroom/advisory class for Scouts only. The idea bloomed two years ago


when Parrett’s son and other Scout friends would come to Parrett’s advisory class to work on merit badges. The school already permitted “special-interest” advisory classes for student council and other activities, so school administrators welcomed Parrett’s suggestion. Soon, he had 35 Scouts reporting


for duty each day. Between them, Parrett and Sledjeski are certified counselors for 13 merit badges. Parrett c


for duty each da and Sledjeski are 13 merit badges. P school a “tremendo “Before we started t eight boys telling m quit Scouts,” he said. already got a waiting Jeff Parrett, a history te leader in Hauppauge M Island, N.Y., has found a active and interested. Pa (and Eagle Scout) Marc S homeroom/advisory class The idea bloomed t


when Parrett’s son and oth would come to Parrett’s adv work on merit badges. The s permitted “special-interest” ad for student council and other school administrators suggesti


Great Teacher


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52