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WHAT’S NEW A Knot That Binds


Some time later this year, you may see a new patch or lapel pin on some uniforms and suit jackets. The red, blue, and gold square knot is the BSA Alumni Award, and it signifies a Scouter who has helped other Scouting alumni reconnect. Developed by the national Alumni Relations


Committee, the award goes to alums who have demonstrated accomplishments in four areas: alumni identification and promotion, alumni engagement, personal participation, and personal education. For details about the registration process, go to bsaalumni.org.


GOTTA HAVE IT


IN THE EVENT OF AN EMERGENCY


Here’s a multifunction device that will come in handy all over the outdoors. For openers, the solar-powered Raptor from Eton Corp. (etoncorp. com) will charge your cell phone via USB. And what else does it bring to the party? Try an altimeter, barometer, compass, AM-FM- weather band digital radio, LED flashlight, digital clock with alarm, and—we’re not kidding—a bottle opener. Rugged, rubberized, and weighing just 11.3 ounces, the Raptor is one power-packing device. $130.


TO DO A Wilderness Odyssey


Youth Arrowmen can take part in two life-changing, 12-day programs at Northern Tier. The OA Wilderness Voyage in northern Minnesota’s Superior National Forest and OA Canadian Odyssey in Ontario’s Quetico Provincial Park stress the principles of Scouting while immersing boys in one of the nation’s last true wilderness areas. During the first week, Arrowmen provide “Cheerful Service,” helping


to repair portage trails. The second week is spent paddling the beautiful lakes, observing wildlife, and building lasting friendships. Cost: $200. For more information and to register, go to adventure.oa-bsa.org.


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S COUTING ¿ MAY•JUNE 2011


ROGER MORGAN/BSA FILES


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